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What's Going Around?

Allergies

Seasonal allergies, or hayfever, are very common at this time of year. Typical symptoms include watery, itchy, red eyes; a clear runny nose; sneezing; and an itchy palate or throat. The most common triggers are trees in the spring, grasses in the summer, and weeds in the fall!

Effective non-sedating medications are now available for children over the age of 2 without a prescription for treatment of seasonal allergies. These include loratadine (generic Claritin), Claritin, and Zyrtec. These medications can be given as needed for allergy symptoms. If you think your child has seasonal allergies and he or she is not responding to medication OR if you are not sure, please make an appointment in our office.

Many children do not require allergy testing if they respond to treatment with medication as needed.

For more information: See also Eye - Allergy


Ear Aches/Ear Infections

A typical middle ear infection in a child begins with either aviral infection(such as a common cold) or unhealthy bacterial growth. Sometimes themiddle earbecomes inflamed and causes fluid buildup behind the eardrum. In other cases, the eustachian tubes — the narrow passageways connecting the middle ear to the back of the nose — become swollen.

Children are more prone to both of these problems for several reasons. The passages in their ears are narrower, shorter, and more horizontal than the adult versions. Because it’s easier for germs to reach the middle ear, it’s also easier for fluid to get trapped there. And just as children are still developing, so are their immune systems. Once the infection takes hold, it’s harder for a child’s body to fight it than it is for a healthy adult’s.

The symptoms of an ear infection may be hard to detect. A child who constantly tugs or pulls at the ear could simply be exploring, or simply showing a self-soothing reflex — even though that tops the list of signals listed in many books and Web sites.

For more information:www.healthychildren.org

Hand-Foot-Mouth Disease

Hand-foot-mouth disease is a common viral illness caused by the Coxsackie A-16 virus (a member of the enterovirus family). Its name describes the location of the rash during the illness.
Typically children experience fever and small blisters in the mouth in the first few days followed by small blisters on the hands and then feet. Sometimes the rash is seen in the diaper area as well. The mouth blisters can be painful. Ibuprofen or acetaminophen can be given as needed for pain relief. It is important to make sure your child receives plenty of fluids. Cold liquids may provide pain relief as well.

Call our office for an appointment if you think your child may be showing symptoms of dehydration during this illness (urinating less than every 8 hours, dry mouth, or lethargy); if the fever persists after the first 3-4 days; or if you cannot keep the pain under control.

For more information: See also Mouth Ulcers , See also Rash or Redness - Widespread


Strep Throat

We are currently seeing quite a bit of strep throat. If your child has a fever, sore throat, headache, or stomachache without any other viral symptoms like congestion or cough, it may be strep throat. Bacteria, called Group A strep, cause this type of sore throat. To diagnose strep throat, your physician will require a swab of your child's throat, and antibiotics will be needed if the strep test is positive.

For more information: See also Sore Throat , See also Strep Throat Exposure